Chinatown - doing 'street'

August 1, 2019

 

 

 

Street photography really isn't my scene. It's not that I dislike it as a medium; in fact I admire those photographers who embrace it and produce excellent work. I just find it hard. I get a bit embarrassed at what I feel is sticking my camera's lens into the life, if not the face, of a person on the street. It seems I'm not the only one who feels that way.

A month ago I took part on a one day street photography workshop in London. In part it was because I do like the medium and wish I could do it better, and also because I wanted to see what 'a pro' said about my fear. As it turned out the other three people on the workshop all admitted to the same feeling.  The workshop was run by Kevin Mullins, a wedding photographer and street photographer who has a distinct documentary style to his work. I've been following Kevin's work for a few years now so the opportunity to do a workshop with him was a bit of a no-brainer.  After meeting up, and during a coffee, Kevin explained the plan for the day and addressed our questions - specifically the 'sticking the camera into someone's face' one. As it turns out, most people don't even really notice you or the camera unless you're making a scene. Set up your background, have a plan for what you want, and then let people walk onto your stage - that's the basics.  So off we went with Kevin setting us mini-assignments (prominent colour, zone focusing, spot metering, three or more people in the shot but not overlapping, get low, get a sausage dog (yup, but we failed)). Then we went into Chinatown with the object of getting a handful of shots which tells the story of a visit to the place. So here they are, a few of the shots from that day.

Kevin happens to be a member of a photography collective, Kage, that just so happens to have another of my favourite photographers within it, Patrick Laroque. Patrick is a Fujifilm camera user (as is Kevin for that matter), and manages to get some beautiful colours out of his photographs by using various in camera settings and some post production work. I don't know exactly what some of his settings are but I have tried here to try a similar form of processing within Capture One.

 

 Taken on a Fuji X100F

 

 

 

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